Dental X-ray

Is the pictures of the teeth, bones, and soft tissues around them to help find problems with the teeth, mouth, and jaw. X-ray pictures can show cavities, hidden dental structures (such as wisdom teeth), and bone loss that cannot be seen during a visual examination. Dental X-rays may also be done as follow-up after dental treatments.

Parameters defined during the test

  • Teeth contour
  • The presence of decay cavities, their dimensions, depth and the proportion to the tooth cavity
  • Paradontal condition
  • Tooth pulp condition
  • Inter-alveolar septum condition
  • Accuracy of the pulp cap, excavation and filling material.
  • Toothache
  • Increased sensitivity of the tooth
  • Shaky tooth
  • Pyorrhea under the dental crown
  • Redness, swelling and soreness of the gums
  • Discoloration of tooth enamel
  • The presence of visible cavities in the tooth
  • Medical procedures execution control

Before the X-ray test, tell your doctor if you are or might be pregnant. Dental X-rays are only done on your mouth area, but if you are pregnant, routine dental X-rays may be postponed so you do not have any radiation to your baby (fetus). If dental X-rays are absolutely needed, a lead apron will be placed over your belly to shield your baby from the X-rays.

You do not need to do anything else before having a dental X-ray.

How the procedure is performed

Dental X-rays are taken in the dentist's office. The X-ray pictures are read by your dentist.

A dental technician will cover you with a heavy lead apron as you sit upright in a chair. This apron shields your body from X-rays. The technician can cover your neck with the collar of the apron (called a thyroid shield) to shield the thyroid gland from radiation.

Everyone else in the room wears a protective apron or stays behind a protective shield.

The dental technician will have you bite down on a small piece of cardboard or plastic. The cardboard or plastic holds X-ray film. You may do this several times to get pictures of all your teeth. Some X-ray machines have a camera that circles your head and takes pictures of your teeth while you sit or stand.

You may want to rinse your mouth before and after the X-rays.

Some dentists use digital radiography. This method uses an electronic sensor instead of X-ray film. An electronic image is taken and stored in a computer. This image can be viewed on a computer screen. Less radiation is needed to make an image with digital radiography than with standard dental X-rays.

 Abnormalities determined by Dental X-ray

  • Primary / secondary caries
  • Pulpitis
  • Degenerative processes in the pulp
  • Amphodontitis
  • Developmental abnormalities, such as cysts and some types of tumors
  • An abscess (an infection at the root of a tooth or between the gum and a tooth)
  • Gingivitis
  • Periodontitis
  • Parodontosis
  • Eosinophilic granuloma

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