Basal cell carcinoma

Is a type of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma begins in the basal cells — a type of cell within the skin that produces new skin cells as old ones die off. Basal cell carcinoma often appears as a slightly transparent bump on the skin, though it can take other forms. Basal cell carcinoma occurs most often on areas of the skin that are exposed to the sun, such as your head and neck.

Symptoms:

  • A pearly white, skin-colored or pink bump that is translucent, meaning you can see a bit through the surface. Tiny blood vessels are often visible. In people with darker skin tones, the lesion would be darker but still somewhat translucent. The most common type of basal cell carcinoma, this lesion often appears on the face, ears or neck. The lesion may rupture, bleed and scab over.
  • A brown, black or blue lesion — or a lesion with dark spots — with a slightly raised, translucent border.
  • A flat, scaly, reddish patch with a raised edge is more common on the back or chest. Over time, these patches can grow quite large.
  • A white, waxy, scar-like lesion without a clearly defined border, called morpheaform basal cell carcinoma, is the least common. This lesion is easy to overlook, but it may be a sign of a particularly invasive and disfiguring cancer.

Preliminary plan:

Doctors

Thank you for choosing GVM International!

Our staff will contact you shortly

Book an appointment

Our staff will contact you shortly to confirm all details

Thank you for choosing GVM International!

Our staff will contact you shortly

Book an appointment

Our staff will contact you shortly to confirm all details

Order a treatment

Our staff will contact you shortly to confirm all details

Request a call back

Our staff will contact you shortly to confirm all details

Thank you for choosing GVM International!

Our staff will contact you shortly